the latest in Ulcerative Colitis Care
view counter
Subscribe for Free
view counter
Ulcerative Colitis Dementia Resource Back Health Resource Dermatology Resource
August 19, 2014

Dr. Pradeep Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, is the ENT service chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.
Dr. Paul Cortin, MD, Opthalmology Service Chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, New Brunswick, Campbellton, Canada.
Dr. O. Oni, MD, Paediatrician, Campbellton Regional Hospital, New Brunswick, Campbellton, Canada Hospital,NB,Campbellton,Canada.

Abstract
A case of congenital nasolacrimal mucocele presenting with medial canthus cystic mass and purulent eye discharge is reported. Clinical features, investigations and treatment modalities are described after reviewing the literature.
Key Words: CNDM (congenital nasolacrimal duct mucocoele), dacrocystocoele, dacryocele,
lacrimal sac cyst, amniotocele, medial canthus cystic mass, purulent conjunctivitis, surgical probing, silicone intubation, marsupialization.

Dr. Pradeep Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, is the ENT service chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.
Dr. Paul Cortin, MD, Opthalmology Service Chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, New Brunswick, Campbellton, Canada.
Dr. O. Oni, MD, Paediatrician, Campbellton Regional Hospital, New Brunswick, Campbellton, Canada Hospital,NB,Campbellton,Canada.

May 20, 2014

Dr. Pradeep Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, is the ENT service chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

Abstract
A case of pyogenic granuloma of gingiva is presented. Aetiology factors, clinical presentations and different treatment modalities are discussed after reviewing the literature.
Key Words: Pyogenic granuloma, Gingival hyperplasia, Peripheral giant cell granuloma, peripheral ossifying fibroma, lobular capillary haemangioma.

Dr. Pradeep Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, is the ENT service chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

Abstract
A case of pyogenic granuloma of gingiva is presented. Aetiology factors, clinical presentations and different treatment modalities are discussed after reviewing the literature.
Key Words: Pyogenic granuloma, Gingival hyperplasia, Peripheral giant cell granuloma, peripheral ossifying fibroma, lobular capillary haemangioma.

April 4, 2014

Dr. Pradeep Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, is the ENT service chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.
Dr. Michael Aldea, MD, Anesthesiologists, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.
Dr. Jami Sridhar, MD, Anesthesiologists, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

Abstract

Tonsillectomy is a routine surgery performed in Campbellton Regional Hospital. Before January 2012 all the tonsillectomies were one day procedure. Due to reduction in the hospital beds, there was a significant pressure on the ENT service to perform more of tonsillectomies as day case procedures.

A Prospective and retrospective study was done for the day case tonsillectomies from January 2012 till June 2013 and results are reported.

Key words: DCT (day-case-tonsillectomy), post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage (PTH), post-tonsillectomy pain (PTP),Post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), ASA (American Society of Anaesthesiologist) grading of patients, PACU (Post-anesthesia care Unit).

Dr. Pradeep Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, is the ENT service chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.
Dr. Michael Aldea, MD, Anesthesiologists, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.
Dr. Jami Sridhar, MD, Anesthesiologists, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

January 22, 2014

P.K. Shenoy, MD, FRCS, DLO, FACS, ENT Service Chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, NB, Canada.

Dr. Lyew Warren, MD, FRCSC, Consultant Pathologist, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

Abstract
Nasal vestibular mass are not commonly seen in ENT practice. We are presenting a patient with a large right nasal vestibular mass, who complained of nasal obstruction and epistaxis. Differential diagnosis of the similar growths in the nasal vestibule with their pathology and the treatment options, have been reviewed from the literature.
Key Words: Nasal vestibular mass, papilloma, 0 and 30 degree endoscopes, lateral rhinotomy.

Dr. Pradeep Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, is the ENT service chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.
Dr. Lyew Warren, MD, FRCSC, Consultant Pathologist, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

November 20, 2013

Dr. Pradeep Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, is the ENT service chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.
Dr. Lyew Warren, MD, FRCSC, Consultant Pathologist, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

Abstract
A case of a fleshy, granular, pedunculated growth from the oral cavity will be presented. A differential diagnosis of similar growths from the oral cavity and the treatment options will be discussed.
Key Words: congenital epulis, epulis fissuratum, granular cell tumour, immunohistochemistry S-100, vimentin, neurone specific enolase, CO2 laser excision.

Dr. Pradeep Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, is the ENT service chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.
Dr. Lyew Warren, MD, FRCSC, Consultant Pathologist, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

September 16, 2013

P.K. Shenoy, MD, FRCS, DLO, FACS, ENT Service Chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, NB, Canada.

Dr.K.B.Bali, MBBS, MS, FACS, Senior ENT Specialist,
Al Ain Hospital, Al Ain, UAE.

Abstract
Cholesteatoma is a benign growth of skin in abnormal location such as the middle ear or the petrous apex which is located deep in the inner ear and is known to cause a variety of complications. We describe a patient with a cholesteatoma who had right facial paresis that improved after the removal of the cholesteatoma. Review of the literature regarding cholesteatoma is discussed.
Key Words: cholesteatoma, labrynthine fistula, facial paresis, attic defect, primary acquired, secondary acquired.

Dr. Pradeep Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, is ENT service chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

Dr.K.B.Bali, MBBS, MS, FACS, Senior ENT Specialist, Al Ain Hospital, Al Ain, UAE.

August 16, 2013

P.K. Shenoy, MD, FRCS, DLO, FACS, ENT Service Chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, NB, Canada.

Dr.K.B.Bali, MBBS, MS, FACS, Senior ENT Specialist,
Al Ain Hospital, Al Ain, UAE.

Abstract
A 7-week-old child presented with left periorbital swelling. Clinical features, investigations, and treatment are discussed. If this condition is not treated properly, it can lead to a series of serious complications. A review of the literature is presented to avoid such complications.
Key Words: PCC (periorbital cellulitis with chemosis), OC (orbital cellulitis), preseptal cellulitis, OA (orbital abscess), SPA (subperiosteal abscess), ethmoidal sinusitis, periorbital swelling.

Dr. Pradeep Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, is ENT service chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

Dr.K.B.Bali, MBBS, MS, FACS, Senior ENT Specialist, Al Ain Hospital, Al Ain, UAE.

July 17, 2013

It was one of those unusual clinics where I saw three similar cases in which the exact same issue surfaced and...

The Clinical Scenario

June 11, 2013

P.K. Shenoy, MD, FRCS, DLO, FACS, ENT Service Chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, NB, Canada.
Ahmad Khatib, MD, L.M.C.C, is a family physician and an ER physician, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

Abstract
A rare case of severe headache presenting with spontaneous pneumocephalus secondary to frontal sinus pneumocele is described. To the best of our knowledge this is the second case presented in the English literature. Clinical presentation, management, and outcome are discussed.
Keywords: spontaneous pneumocephalus, pneumocele, frontal sinus, osteoma, headache.

P.K. Shenoy, MD, FRCS, DLO, FACS, ENT Service Chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, NB, Canada.
Ahmad Khatib, MD, L.M.C.C, is a family physician and an ER physician, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, New Brunswick, Canada.

June 3, 2013

Most health care professionals involved in eldercare have had the experience...

Most health care professionals involved in eldercare have had the experience that some of those we look after seem to be able to recall past experiences with a degree of intensity that may be very disquieting and may even lead to what gets interpreted as agitated behaviour. These same individuals may have had the personal experience as I have from my own life experience, some memories; even those very distant, when recalled are almost as vivid as when they first occurred.

May 21, 2013

I returned from a medical conference overseas...

I returned from a medical conference overseas. As I entered the living room, I could see the small walnut side table my wife emailed me about while I was away. It was placed in front of the gas fireplace, next to my favourite "relax" chair and was the perfect colour and size to fit there, waiting for a cup of coffee, a portable phone and the controller for the small stereo next to it.

February 25, 2013

P.K. Shenoy, MD, FRCS, DLO, FACS, ENT Service Chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, NB, Canada.
K. Bali, MD, MS, Deputy Head, Ear Nose and Throat Department, Al Ain Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.

Abstract
A case of necrotising fasciitis of the neck originating from odontogenic infection is presented. Clinical features including pathogenesis and treatment are discussed along with a review of the literature.
Keywords: necrotising fasciitis, flesh eating bacterial disease, synergistic necrotizing cellulitis, killer bug disease, fasciitis necrotans, surgical débridement, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, multi-organ failure, toxic shock syndrome, Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy (DIC), Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotising Fasciitis (LRINEC).

P.K. Shenoy, MD, FRCS, DLO, FACS, ENT Service Chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, Campbellton, NB, Canada.
K. Bali, MD, MS, Deputy Head, Ear Nose and Throat Department, Al Ain Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.

August 28, 2012

A Clinical Presentation and Review of the Literature

Pradeep K. Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, ENT Service Chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, NB, Campbellton, Canada.

Abstract
A case of acute tonsillitis is reported where proper antibiotic treatment was not given because of a negative throat culture, and the patient presented with complications. Review of the literature regarding acute tonsillitis, its presentation, treatment and various complications are discussed.
Keywords: acute tonsillitis, throat swab, peritonsillar abscess, retropharyngeal abscess, parapharyngeal abscess, GABHS, MRSA, PANDAS, Lemierre’s syndrome.

A Clinical Presentation and Review of the Literature

Pradeep K. Shenoy, MD, DLO, FRCS, FACS, ENT Service Chief, Campbellton Regional Hospital, NB, Campbellton, Canada.

December 20, 2011

Hearing impairment is a common phenomenon in the older population...

A lot of effort goes into alerting people to the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and other causes of dementia. Organizations such as the Alzheimer Society have done a commendable job in helping the lay public as well as health care professionals as to what the symptoms and signs are in people showing evidence of possible cognitive impairment and urging them to see seek assistance, assessment and advice.

October 1, 2008

Christopher Hilton, MD, Instructor, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
Tina Huang, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common neurosensory deficit associated with aging. It presents with a predictable pattern of sensorineural hearing loss, causing problems with communication that have been associated with depression and social isolation. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the etiology of ARHL on a molecular level. While treatment options exist with hearing aids and cochlear implants, prevention by identification and avoidance of key risk factors remains the best strategy for dealing with this disease.
Key words: presbycusis, age-related hearing loss, deafness, hearing aids, aging.

Christopher Hilton, MD, Instructor, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
Tina Huang, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

July 1, 2008

Mark A. Lutterbie, MD, Fellow in Family Medicine, University of Virginia, Department of Family Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA.
Daniel F. McCarter, MD, Vice-Chair and Associate Professor of Family Medicine, University of Virginia, Department of Family Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA.

Cerumen, or earwax, is the product of the sebaceous and ceruminous glands combined with débrided epithelial cells and hair from the external auditory canal. Cerumen is usually extruded by a combination of jaw movements from chewing and speech, and natural epithelial migration. However, cerumen may become impacted, especially among older adults and individuals with mental retardation. Cerumen impaction may cause hearing loss, otitis externa, vertigo, tinnitus, or cough. There are multiple methods for removing earwax, with limited evidence to support any of the current practices. Irrigation or manual disimpaction using a curette have long been the accepted earwax removal methods, yet neither has been subjected to comparative trials with other methods. Irrigation alone is effective in up to 70% of cases of impacted cerumen. Ceruminolytics or eardrops are effective in up to 40% of cases without irrigation, and when combined with irrigation can be effective up to 97%. Cotton ear buds and ear candling should be avoided.
Key words: cerumen, earwax, irrigation, ceruminolytic, impaction.

Mark A. Lutterbie, MD, Fellow in Family Medicine, University of Virginia, Department of Family Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA.
Daniel F. McCarter, MD, Vice-Chair and Associate Professor of Family Medicine, University of Virginia, Department of Family Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA.

July 1, 2008

Our eyes and our ears are how we make sense of the world around us. While many people have been very successful despite visual or hearing impairments (and on occasion both), many of the compensatory abilities tend to decline with age. For example, as people age, more of their balance abilities depend on vision. Thus with increasing visual impairment, we get increased likelihood of falling. Even minor degrees of cognitive difficulty dramatically increase the impact of visual and hearing impairments. Simple tasks, such as injecting insulin, or taking the right pill at the proper time become very challenging with sensory impairment. Hearing-impaired older persons do not hear our instructions properly and often are too embarrassed to ask us to repeat, or do not even realize they have missed important information. Not surprisingly, both ophthalmologists and otorhinolaryngologists see large numbers of older patients. It is thus very important that at Geriatrics & Aging we provide a focus on aging eyes and ears.

Our continuing education article this month is “Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Leading Cause of Blindness among Older Adults” by Dr. Robert Coffee and Dr. Tara Young. I am particularly interested in this article for two reasons. First, recent research has brought about a much greater understanding of the risk factors for the disorder, and second, one of the authors (Dr. Young) was a student of mine before starting a brilliant academic career in the United States.

When I started medical practice, cataract surgery was a crude affair, with patients using contact lenses (often difficult for an 80-year-old with tremor) or unsightly cataract glasses. Times have certainly changed as outlined in another of our focus articles, “The Evolution of Cataract Surgery: The Most Common Eye Procedure in the Older Adult” by Dr. Lorne Bellan. Our third eye-related article is also on a common theme, namely “A Clinical Perspective of Diabetic Retinopathy” by Dr. Chris Hudson. Our last focus article is on a problem that does not sound glamorous, but is extremely important to our patients, “Cerumen Impaction” by Dr. Mark A. Lutterbie and Dr. Daniel McCarter.

As expected, this issue also features articles on several important geriatric topics. Our cardiovascular disease column is on the “Approach to Dyspnea among Older Adults” by Dr. Siamak Moayedi and Dr. Mercedes Torres. Our gastrointestinal health column is entitled “Diagnosis and Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Dyspepsia among Older Adults” and it is authored by Dr. Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten. There is a tie-in with our focus article on diabetic retinopathy in the article by Dr. Medha Munshi and Dr. Alissa Segal entitled “Insulin Therapy for Older Adults with Diabetes.”

Finally, I recall a famous letter in the late 1970’s by David Marsden, a great neuroscientist and movement disorder specialist, calling for research to delineate the difference between Parkinson’s Disease Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease (if in fact there was a difference). This challenge became even more complex when Dementia with Lewy Bodies was described as a discrete entity. Dr. Catherine Agbokou, Dr. Emmanuel Cognat, and Dr. Florian Ferreri address this last clinical dilemma in their article “Parkinson’s Disease Dementia versus Dementia with Lewy Bodies.”

Enjoy this month’s issue,
Barry Goldlist

December 1, 2006

Clodagh M. Ryan, MD MRCPI, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Respirology, University Health Network / University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.

Chronic cough is defined as a cough that persists longer than eight weeks. It is one of the most frequent complaints of patients attending physicians’ outpatient clinics. Contrary to popular belief, the diagnosis and treatment of the majority of patients can be achieved by following an empiric, integrative approach. As chronic cough may be responsible for significant deterioration in quality of life, successful management and treatment is important for individual patients. Unfortunately, failure to adequately manage chronic cough is usually due to physician ignorance of the current diagnostic algorithms, which pertain as much to older as to younger adults.
Key words: chronic cough, older adults, upper airway cough syndrome, reflux disease, asthma.

Clodagh M. Ryan, MD MRCPI, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Respirology, University Health Network / University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.

December 1, 2006

Mary Beth Jennings, PhD, Reg. CASLPO, Aud(C), FAAA, Audiologist, Assistant Professor, National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON.
Frances Richert, MSc, Reg. CASLPO, Audiologist, H.A. Leeper Speech and Hearing Clinic, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders; National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON.

Older adults are the fastest-growing age group in Canada. Hearing loss is highly prevalent among this population. Of those persons who would benefit from the use of hearing aids, only a small number actually own and use them. Digital hearing aids now constitute the majority of hearing aids on the market. Technological advances in hearing aids and hearing assistive technologies have expanded the range of options available to improve the success of device use. Matching the needs and optimizing performance of older adults with the broad range of devices available requires appropriate assessment, selection, verification, and follow-up by the audiologist.
Key words: hearing aids, hearing assistive technologies (HATS), rehabilitation services, older adults.

Mary Beth Jennings, PhD, Reg. CASLPO, Aud(C), FAAA, Audiologist, Assistant Professor, National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON.
Frances Richert, MSc, Reg. CASLPO, Audiologist, H.A. Leeper Speech and Hearing Clinic, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders; National Centre for Audiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON.

March 1, 2006

Jie Jin Wang, MMed, PhD, Centre for Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Westmead Millennium Institute, University of Sydney, Australia.
Jennifer L. Smith, BA, PhD, Australian Health Policy Institute, University of Sydney, Australia.
Stephen R. Leeder, BSc (Med), MB, PhD, Australian Health Policy Institute, University of Sydney, and The Menzies Centre for Public Health Policy, Australia.

Vision and hearing impairments are common in older people. They not only impact on the quality of life and independent living of affected individuals, but also contribute to the overall burden of aged care. Although current evidence supports screening for age-related vision and/or hearing impairments, good- quality evidence on the effectiveness of sensory interventions (e.g., treatment for eye conditions or rehabilitation for hearing loss) is lacking. Evidence from community-based randomized controlled trials is needed before implementing community-wide screening. Case-finding during primary health care can be considered. Strategies to reduce the overall burden from common disabilities, including sensory impairments, among older people are keys to achieving the goal of “aging well, aging productively.”
Key words: aging, screening, vision, hearing, sensory impairment.

Jie Jin Wang, MMed, PhD, Centre for Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Westmead Millennium Institute, University of Sydney, Australia.
Jennifer L. Smith, BA, PhD, Australian Health Policy Institute, University of Sydney, Australia.
Stephen R. Leeder, BSc (Med), MB, PhD, Australian Health Policy Institute, University of Sydney, and The Menzies Centre for Public Health Policy, Australia.

August 1, 2005

Jerome D. Schein, PhD, Professor Emeritus, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Adjunct Professor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Maurice H. Miller, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, New York, NY, USA.

For persons whose hearing does not return in 60–90 days following idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL), audiologic rehabilitation should be provided. This article describes aspects of audiologic rehabilitation, including counselling, information about lifestyle changes, and techniques (such as amplification) for overcoming the communication handicap ISSNHL imposes. Advantages and limitations of various hearing aids are presented.
Key words: audiology, counselling, hearing aids, otology, rehabilitation, sensorineural, hearing loss.

Jerome D. Schein, PhD, Professor Emeritus, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Adjunct Professor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Maurice H. Miller, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, New York, NY, USA.

June 1, 2005

Maurice H. Miller, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology/Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
Jerome D. Schein, PhD, Professor Emeritus, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Adjunct Professor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.

Hearing loss that occurs instantaneously or over a period of a few days without immediately apparent cause is called Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (ISSNHL). In part 1 of this series, the diagnosis and initial treatment of this condition are described in relation to most patients’ demands for active and aggressive intervention. Part 2 (to follow in the next issue) will address rehabilitation.
Key words: audiology, deafness, diagnosis, hearing aids, idiopathic, otology, rehabilitation, unilateral and bilateral hearing loss, sensorineural.

Maurice H. Miller, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology & Audiology/Steinhardt School of Education, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
Jerome D. Schein, PhD, Professor Emeritus, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Adjunct Professor, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.

June 1, 2003

 

John P. Preece, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI.
Richard S. Tyler, PhD, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.
William Noble, PhD, School of Psychology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.

Hearing loss in the elderly is a frequently acknowledged problem. Prevalence of hearing loss clearly increases with age, to as high as 50% of persons older than 70 years. Less recognised is an often-related problem, tinnitus. We are concerned here about pathological tinnitus: that which lasts more than five minutes more than once a week. In this article we review the prevalence of tinnitus as a function of age, and its causes and mechanisms. We also describe problems commonly associated with chronic tinnitus and some treatment options. We conclude with some special considerations for the elderly patient.
Key words: tinnitus, prevalence, counseling, sound therapy.

 

John P. Preece, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI.
Richard S. Tyler, PhD, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.
William Noble, PhD, School of Psychology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia.

May 1, 2003

 

Doron Milstein, PhD, Hofstra University, Long Island, NY, USA.
Barbara E. Weinstein, PhD, Graduate School and University Center, CUNY, New York, NY, USA.

Hearing loss diminishes quality of life. The elderly rely on auditory input to maintain social contact and awareness of their environment, such that hearing loss in this age group can lead to isolation and withdrawal from the community. Most elderly individuals do not take advantage of available audiological services nor do they use hearing aids (HAs), the treatment of choice for their hearing loss. Modern HAs utilise digital technology and computer software to improve speech intelligibility. Current research reveals that HAs are effective in minimising the negative consequences of hearing loss in the daily functioning of the elderly. The availability of sophisticated technology allows for more efficient HA fitting, and allows the audiologist to spend more time counseling.
Key words: presbycusis, hearing aid technologies, rehabilitation, assistive listening devices.

 

Doron Milstein, PhD, Hofstra University, Long Island, NY, USA.
Barbara E. Weinstein, PhD, Graduate School and University Center, CUNY, New York, NY, USA.