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The Patient with Newly Diagnosed Ulcerative Colitis: Anticipating the Questions and Individualizing the Answers
Informed patients are one of the most important assets available in the management of patients with ulcerative colitis. Clinical experience reinforces that most patients have similar questions upon diagnosis.

Clinical Reviews

Marc Bradette MD, FRCPC, CSPQ
With this special issue of the Journal of Current Clinical Care we aim to provide community healthcare professionals with practical clinical insight and support in managing patients with ulcerative colitis.

James Gregor MD
Informed patients are one of the most important assets available in the management of patients with ulcerative colitis.

Geoffrey C. Nguyen MD, PhD
5-Aminosalicylates (5-ASAs) are considered first-line therapy for mild to moderate ulcerative colitis because of their proven effectiveness and safety profile, even in pregnancy.

Brian Bressler MD, MS, FRCPC
A 28-year-old male presented to our office for a consultation about his bloody bowel movements. Colonoscopy revealed moderately active left-sided ulcerative colitis extending from the anal verge up to the mid-descending colon.
A. Hillary Steinhart MD
Although medical therapy for ulcerative colitis is usually effective at inducing clinical remission, numerous studies have shown that patients in clinical remission may have ongoing and varying degrees of mucosal inflammation.
With this special issue of the Journal of Current Clinical Care (JCCC), we aim to provide community healthcare professionals (HCPs) with practical clinical insight and support in managing patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).
Health Plexus
From time-to-time we select a topic and present the information and facts in an exciting and visually informative format.
M. Bachir Tazkarji MD, CCFP, ABFM
As the population is aging, physicians from all specialties are expected to see more older adults at their outpatient practices and in the acute settings.
Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten
Dyspepsia is defined as an epigastric pain or discomfort thought to originate in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract.
Hershl Berman et al.
There appears to be no specific effect of aging on bowel function. It is more likely the cumulative result of decreased mobility, comorbid illness, and medication side effects that cause a higher incidence of constipation among older adults.